All posts by Megan

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Asda – why are you still using ‘boys’ and ‘girls’ signs?

In the three years that Let Toys Be Toys has been up and running we’ve had an overwhelmingly positive response from retailers. Fourteen major UK retailers, including Tesco and Sainsbury’s, have engaged positively with us and have agreed to remove ‘Girl’ and ‘Boy’ signs from toy aisles. Asda however, has yet to respond.

Read more…

Fashion dolls - new signage in Toys R Us

Toys R Us drops ‘boys’ and ‘girls’ categories from UK website

We’re delighted to see the end of ‘boys’ and ‘girls’ categories in the major retailer’s online store, as well as clearer, inclusive signage in stores.

Back in 2013 Let Toys Be Toys met with Toys R Us to discuss concerns about the gendered way in which toys were being marketed. At that meeting Toys R Us committed to replacing gendered signage in its stores and producing more inclusive catalogues. They also promised to look further into whether they could make changes to their web categories and consider how products are grouped in store. It’s great to see the results of those discussions now online, and in stores.  Read more…

Checking in with Toys R Us

You may remember we met with Toys R Us in September 2013 when they committed to a more inclusive approach to toy marketing. We’ve certainly seen improvements since then, but we still have some questions over their timescale for change.

We’ve contacted Managing Director Roger McLaughlan by e-mail to find out if they have any updates. Read more…

Homework1

Raising the issue of stereotypes in school – case study

It can be daunting to raise a question with your child’s school. Will the teacher be angry or offended? Might you get labelled as a nuisance? Megan explains how she went about querying the language of a homework assignment which reinforced stereotypes about who can be an inventor. Read more…

Boy and girl on a merry-go-round

‘One of each’

From the freedom of the toddler years to learning what society expects – as parent of a boy and a girl Megan Perryman explains the biggest difference between her son and her daughter… how everyone else treats them.

So my family’s now complete. I have ‘one of each’. A pretty princess with a head full of sparkles, and a rough and tumble boy with dirty knees and a cheeky grin. The next few years will be full of princesses, ponies and fairies for her, and dinosaurs, trucks, and space ships for him. Those poor families whose second child was the same gender as their first. How disappointed they must be with their clone children with completely identical interests!

Except – let’s face it – that’s not quite how it works. Read more…

Montage of boys and girls book covers

Let Books Be Books campaign update

Since we launched the Let Books Be Books campaign in March we’ve seen major publishers confirm that they will no longer publish titles labelled ‘for girls’ or ‘for boys’.  So who’s still holding out for gendered marketing, and where next for the campaign?

Read more…