All posts by Tricia

Cordelia Fine, Testosterone Rex: Unmaking the Myths of Our Gendered Minds (Icon, 2017),  256pp.

Book Review: ‘Testosterone Rex: Unmaking the Myths of our Gendered Minds’

The belief that humans have evolved into two distinct types of people with very different natures – competitive, risk-taking males and gentle, empathic females, is widespread and powerful, but is it true? In her latest popular neuroscience book, Professor Cordelia Fine takes us through the science that led to the idea of ‘Testosterone Rex’.

Read more…

International Men’s Day

pinkboyquote

Toy shelves - Lego Friends building sets under a 'Fashion and dolls' sign

Help Let Toys Be Toys – take our 2016 shopping survey

Which toy retailers are letting toys be toys? Help us find out!

Take our toy shop survey Read more…

NO MORE_INLINE_TAG_BADGE_CMYK

Why we partnered with the UK SAYS NO MORE campaign

Let Toys Be Toys recently agreed to partner with UK SAYS NO MORE – a national campaign to raise awareness to end domestic violence and sexual assault. The NO MORE campaign started in the United States and launched in the UK earlier this year, overseen by London-based charity Hestia.

Read more…

There are just toys…

buzz

Let’s allow children to choose for themselves

Christina Hoff Sommers got in touch with us on Twitter to let us know that she ‘respectfully disagreed’ with our campaign and outlined her reasons why in a piece in The Federalist: ‘Those Who Push For Toy Neutrality Don’t Get Little Girls At All’. Here’s our response:

Read more…

flowcertif

Let Toys Be Toys Awarded the BRIO Prize

Let Toys Be Toys has been awarded the BRIO Prize in a ceremony at the Swedish company’s headquarters in Malmö.

Our campaigners Jess Day and Tricia Lowther travelled to Sweden to pick up the award on behalf of Let Toys Be Toys. Tricia writes here about their day as guests of BRIO and what winning the award means for the campaign.

Read more…

bg

What’s wrong with pink and blue?

“What’s wrong with pink and blue?” Let Toys Be Toys campaigners are often asked this question. Tricia Lowther looks at some of the issues around colour coding.

How can there be anything wrong with pink or blue, aren’t they just colours?

Yes they are, and they are also used as cultural signifiers; codes that mean ‘boy’ or ‘girl’, and are used to segregate children (and sometimes adults) into two distinct groups to be targeted in very different ways. Despite retailers moving away from explicit ‘girls’ and ‘boys’ signs in shops, while we still have pink aisles and blue aisles we still have toys segregated by gender.
Read more…

Cash registers at Target

Changes at Target hit the mark

It’s great to see that one of the largest retailers in the US, Target, have acknowledged customer concerns and decided to move away from gender based signs.

In an official statement released on their website on Friday they say:

Over the past year, guests have raised important questions about a handful of signs in our stores that offer product suggestions based on gender….we know that shopping preferences and needs change and, as guests have pointed out, in some departments like Toys, Home or Entertainment, suggesting products by gender is unnecessary. Read more…

Gears

12 fun toys to foster STEM skills

As well as being fun, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) toys, are a great way to build skills such as problem solving, spatial awareness and critical thinking.

Of course we all know science is for everyone, but gender bias means STEM toys are often targeted squarely at boys, (or else given a dusting of pink glitter and lipstick as if that’s the only way to get girls interested). We’ve chosen twelve toys to help curious children everywhere develop an interest in science and discovery. Read more…