All posts tagged gender marketing

Elsa doll and Baymax toy

Setting the children free: parenting without stereotypes

When Rebecca Asher was researching her book Man Up, she found one message consistently came through loud and clear: the commonalities between boys and girls far outweigh the differences. She outlines for Let Toys Be Toys how the way we raise children and the gender stereotypes we bring to our parenting create and magnify any differences between the sexes.

rebecca-asher

I have never put much store by parenting manuals. Eight years into my career as a parent, I have turned to them on only a handful of occasions. Yet at the same time I have always been baffled by folksy advice to ‘rely on my maternal instinct’. I am not convinced that I have that instinct – maternal, parental, call it what you will. I love my children but I don’t believe that this love translates into always knowing exactly how best to meet their needs. Read more…

Screenshot of @genderclassroom twitter profile

Boys and girls in the classroom: @genderclassroom project

Children come to school to learn – what do they pick up in school about gender? Newly qualified teacher @genderclassroom tells us about their first year in the classroom, how children are learning and applying the ‘gender rules’, and how boys and girls are treated differently, even by staff who believe they’re even-handed.

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Whatever you fancy?

Dressing up ought to be a chance to let the imagination run riot, but marketing offers narrow roles for girls and boys to play.  Megan Perryman takes a look.

Are you filled with excitement or dread as you plan your children’s Halloween costumes? For me, it’s a bit of both as I attempt to fight against the sexist messages that saturate the fancy dress industry. Read more…

Bullying: the role of gender-based marketing

Author Carrie Goldman reflects on a key theme of her  award-winning book Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher, and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear: the role of gender-based marketing in creating and reinforcing bullying attitudes.

c_goldmanIn November 2010, I wrote a post called Anti-Bullying Starts in the First Grade for my ChicagoNow blog, Portrait of an Adoption. I was concerned because my daughter, Katie, was upset about being taunted for carrying a Star Wars water bottle. Apparently, Star Wars was only “for boys.”

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Book review: Bullied, by Carrie Goldman

‘A practical guide with the credibility to get educational and childcare professionals, researchers and parents to sit up and take notice.’ Ailsa Grant-Turton reviews Bullied.

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