All posts tagged schools

Boneco de Sousa_1_(C) Priya Dabasia_Being ManKind

Being ManKind: men and boys in the 21st century

Being ManKind wants to reach children and young adults with positive male role models, using their books, lesson plans and workshops. Editor Joe Byrde tells Let Toys Be Toys about their plans and their new kickstarter campaign.

When Dave Chawner, a stand-up comedian, summoned the courage to go to his GP suffering from depression, he never expected to be diagnosed with clinical anorexia.

When Jack Morris left a promising career in the police to stay at home while his wife went out to work, his friends found it difficult to understand such an arrangement. Read more…

Elsa doll and Baymax toy

Setting the children free: parenting without stereotypes

When Rebecca Asher was researching her book Man Up, she found one message consistently came through loud and clear: the commonalities between boys and girls far outweigh the differences. She outlines for Let Toys Be Toys how the way we raise children and the gender stereotypes we bring to our parenting create and magnify any differences between the sexes.

rebecca-asher

I have never put much store by parenting manuals. Eight years into my career as a parent, I have turned to them on only a handful of occasions. Yet at the same time I have always been baffled by folksy advice to ‘rely on my maternal instinct’. I am not convinced that I have that instinct – maternal, parental, call it what you will. I love my children but I don’t believe that this love translates into always knowing exactly how best to meet their needs. Read more…

Screenshot of @genderclassroom twitter profile

Boys and girls in the classroom: @genderclassroom project

Children come to school to learn – what do they pick up in school about gender? Newly qualified teacher @genderclassroom tells us about their first year in the classroom, how children are learning and applying the ‘gender rules’, and how boys and girls are treated differently, even by staff who believe they’re even-handed.

Read more…

Recruiting – teacher volunteers

Let Toys Be Toys is seeking qualified teachers to volunteer to help build up our schools resources. Could you help us? Read more…

Homework1

Raising the issue of stereotypes in school – case study

It can be daunting to raise a question with your child’s school. Will the teacher be angry or offended? Might you get labelled as a nuisance? Megan explains how she went about querying the language of a homework assignment which reinforced stereotypes about who can be an inventor. Read more…

homework-full

‘What did he invent?’

This homework project, set for a 6 year old in a UK school, doesn’t even allow the possibility that an inventor might be a woman. Our supporters on Twitter were quick to respond with some useful ideas of women who’ve made great discoveries.

This homework assignment is a great example of how easy it is to pass on unconscious biases about what women and men can do.  Our lesson plan and resources for schools have some ideas for simple ways that teachers can challenge gender stereotypes in the classroomRead more…
Chwarae Teg - Agile nation

Fair Foundations – fair play in the classroom

Laura Davies of Welsh organisation Chwarae Teg (Fair Play) explains the importance of their work with schools to promote gender equality in the classroom.

“A father and son are out cycling together. Suddenly a lorry thunders past, knocking the son off his bike. He is rushed to hospital. In the operating theatre, on seeing the boy the surgeon exclaims: “I can’t operate on this child, he is my son!”

Did you have a moment of surprise? And did you feel a little foolish afterwards? Read more…

Two children in school uniform walking holding hands with a man.

Let Toys Be Toys launches resources for schools

As a new term starts, Let Toys Be Toys are launching resources for teachers who want to challenge gender stereotypes in the classroom.

Children are keen to fit in and quickly pick up ideas about what’s supposedly ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’, but stereotyped ideas can limit their aspirations and opportunities.

Many toys and books are marketed as being for one sex or the other and children may worry if their favourite toys or hobbies challenge these stereotypical ideas. Parents and carers are often concerned that children who challenge these norms will be teased or bullied.

The Let Toys Be Toys campaign has been approached by parents and teachers highlighting problems in this area. So we’ve worked with teachers to develop resources to help schools tackle these issues in the classroom.  Visit the new Let Toys Be Toys schools pages. Read more…